The You&Me Blog

We didn't get a lot of action on our current poll, but what we did get did not show any preference among the choices. People seemed to equally be interested the topics of families, cancer, etc. We've put up a new poll, so, as they say, vote early and vote often!
Our contributors are doing some amazing things (besides writing for You&Me.) Akil Wingate is a musician as well as a writer: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jesIqrH8Z4s Francis Diclemente writes prose and poetry: https://francisdiclemente.wordpress.com/ Kevin Carlson has been involved in filmaking: http://filmmaker178.rssing.com/browser.php?indx=4156484&item=603
Our contributors get up to some amazing stuff when they aren't on You&Me America's Medical Magazine. For example: They write books! Aimee Heckel http://www.aimeeheckel.com/#!resume-books/c10yw ​Anessa L. Haney http://www.amazon.com/Anessa-L.-Haney/e/B00ITHSV84 ​Angil Tarach-Ritchey http://www.amazon.com/Angil-Tarach-Ritchey-RN-GCM/e/B006LLWY0G ​Brett Weiss http://www.amazon.com/Brett-Weiss/e/B001JS0BCO ​Carol Gee http://www.amazon.com/Carol-Gee/e/B00MI8DJ0A ​
To recap: The Candidates Andrew Jackson Woodrow Wilson Franklin D. Roosevelt John F. Kennedy Which candidate "wins" the prize title of "America's Sickest President?" Remember we are judging on two axes or prongs: The degree of debility and the impact on the presidency. Fourth Runner up: Andrew Jackson. Jackson had a lifetime of very significant medical problems, but it's unclear if they had much impact on his presidency or indeed, were that much worse than what many people endured in the paleo-apocalyptic landscape of America in the beginning of the 19th century. Third Runner up: FDR...
Finalist number four: John F. Kennedy What JFK, super stud? Well about that… One theme that jumps out with our more modern examples is just as with celebrities such as Michael Jackson, being a famous person does not mean you are going to get famously good medical care. In fact Wilson, FDR, Harding and JFK had personal physicians of very minimal competence and/or a tendency to be more interested in maintaining their privileged position than ensuring that their patients got the best possible care. Physicians can be star struck just like everyone else. I think also that some of the blame rests...
Our third finalist: Woodrow Wilson Ever joked that someone with half-a-brain could do as good a job as a president you don’t particularly care for? Well, people in 1920 got to try that on for real with Woodrow Wilson, president from March 1913 to March 1921 (in those days if you won the November election you didn’t start your actual term until the next March.) Mr. Wilson has had the misfortune of having his medical history extensively examined during the years of Freudian psychology ascendancy but it appears he had probably suffered from cerebral vascular disease for years. He’d had transient...
Welcome back to “Our Sickest Presidents” Today’s post deals with our second “finalist” Andrew Jackson. Shooting at Andrew Jackson was like swatting at a wasp. You’d better make a killing hit because otherwise you’ve just made him/her angrier. Jackson was amazingly tough, but then he had to be. Most of his life he suffered from morbidity that would have killed or completely incapacitated a normal man. He does appear to have been fairly healthy as a young man, except for a traumatic few weeks in 1781. The Jackson family was active supporters of independence from Britain. Jackson and his brother...
The medical histories of the past fascinate me. By default, they tend to medical histories of the powerful and famous, because that's the information that people care to study and keep. There's something inspirational, though, in seeing that these people also had their share, and sometimes more than their share, of problems, including medical problems. Presidents, they're just like us! In picking our finalists we looked at two factors--severity of illness and impact on the actual presidency. Here is the amazing history of our first finalist, Franklin Delano Roosevelt. Well, of course, the...
You&Me Announces the Our Sickest Presidents Contest Part of our ongoing blog series on maladies of the rich and famous Factual information for this series is from a number of sources, including Wikipedia, the fascinating book The Health of the Presidents by John R. Bumgarner M.D. and the informative website http://www.doctorzebra.com You’d think that to be president of the United States of America takes so much mental and physical effort that only the super-humanly healthy or lucky can do it. But you’d think wrong. US presidents as a group have suffered from whatever ills of the flesh in...
Continuing our theme of idiosyncratic categorization, Karen has been a very popular first name amongst our contributors. It would be nice if our blog posts seemed able to copy hyperlinks, but just put the relevant info in the search window to get to the articles. Karen Strine is the author of Brain Tumor: Too Much Information? Karen Taylor wrote Progressive Supranuclear Palsy: Dealing with Dad Karen L. Alaniz gave us Multiple Sclerosis: New Shoes, one of our first articles. Karen Ott Mayer wrote Hospice: One Death. Karen Mullins Lamb contributed Cancer: The Diagnosis.

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