The You&Me Blog

Amy Oestreicher, author of "Perchance to Dream" http://www.youandmemagazine.com/articles/perchance-to-dream and Running Away From Depression: My Tale of Surgery and Runner's High" http://www.youandmemagazine.com/articles/running-away-from-depression-my-tale-of-surgery-and-runners-high has a TEDx talk up on Youtube that might be of interest to our readers. She talks about thriving after sexual assault and twenty-seven surgeries. https://youtu.be/0x5KtBAW2EI
Our writers don’t just write essays, they write entire books. Here are links to just a few: Karen Alaniz https://www.amazon.com/Breaking-Code-Daughters-Question-Everything-ebook... David Eyes http://www.amazon.com/David-Eyes/e/B001KIYCU0/ref=sr_tc_2_0?qid=1465846504&sr= 1-2-ent Risa Nye http://www.amazon.com/Risa-Nye/e/B00DF7PU46/ref=dp_byline_cont_pop_book_1 Patricia Cyr https://www.amazon.com/Patients-Perspective-Tips-Doctor-Visits/dp/146364... Stephanie Allen Crist https://www.amazon.com/Discovering-Autism-Neurodiversity-Memoir/dp/15077...
Popular fiction or folkways often gloss over or ignore the diseases of the past and their impact on the people who endured them. Did you see “Master and Commander” or do you enjoy this or the other nautical novels of Patrick O’Brian? Although these are often praised for their authentic detail, they have one glaring admission—scurvy and other diseases would have meant that the crew of the ship in the novel “Master and Commander” would have had to be refreshed about three times during the voyage the book treats with, due to deaths from disease. We guess a movie/book featuring the crew of a ship...
In some ways we wish we could accept all our queries. It doesn’t make us feel good to say no. We have found that it isn’t possible to give each individual feedback on why a query was unsuccessful; some writers don’t want it, some would waste their time on false hopes, trying to “fix” the piece and, although the editorial we has taught creative writing, that’s not the relationship in play here. So we are creating this blog post, as a handy reference to those in search of guidance on how to make a successful query to any magazine, or those wishing to have a list of reasons their query may not...
Dr Smith at the Southern State Hospital for the Insane looks out into the admitting office waiting room on a pleasant Monday morning, May 15, 1916. A quiet day so far, only three patients, two sitting fairly quietly with their groups of attendants, probably family members, and one woman with a man who might be her husband. This one keeps getting up and pacing for a few seconds, then sitting back down. Better get started, Dr. Smith says to himself, there will probably be more, and worse, later today. He calls his first patient, Mrs. McCreedy. She comes into the examining office, accompanied by...
Oh, those silly, ignorant past people! You know, you probably can’t spend a lot of time on the Internet looking at web sites about the history of the past two hundred years without reading someone deploring the Victorian habit, or perhaps it is our habit of attributing this to the Victorians, that women were the “the weaker sex” or that certain physical activities might be dangerous to the frail female, and so on. What a bunch of sexist hogwash, right? Not so fast. Women aren’t necessarily weaker in any meaningful way, but without question women bear the major physical burden involved in...
We were reading a report, written in 2012 about the National High Blood Pressure Education Program (NHBPEP) of the National Heart Lung and Blood Institute (no comma used in their name, apparently.) 2012 was the 40th anniversary of this initiative and the paper noted that when it was started only about a quarter of the people they surveyed knew there was a connection between high blood pressure and heart disease and stroke, and most people were not being treated. After 40 years 90% of people knew about the connection and most of those surveyed were being treated for hypertension or monitoring...
An Interesting Idea? We were reading a long article on the idea of paying everyone a basic income that lets them live decently, rather than having a huge infrastructure of “helping” government payments, like disability, social security, the various rent subsidies, food stamps, school grants, the Veteran’s Administration, mortgage supplements hand-outs and what-not. Instead everyone (“everyone” and “how much” to be defined later) would get a monetary salary and would pay for their food, lodging and so on out of that. There would be no strings, just like a salary, people would be free to spend...
Hello potential contributors, A few times we have tried to get back to someone who has emailed us with a request that we look at something they wrote. But when we try to email them back, we get a spam blocking message to the effect the we have to click or email somewhere else, because they have their privacy filters or whatnot set so they only get emails from people they pre-approve or have on a list or whatever. People, that's rude. If you want to sell your writing and get people to respond to you, after you contacted them, you need to disable this or not do it, because once an editor gets...
We promised you more blog posts--blog posts at You&Me are for tidbits; history, health tips, information for contributors, announcements and so on. We produce all our blog posts in house, and do not accept guest posts. So without further ado- Being more active: A beginner’s guide You can’t spend five minutes on the Internet at Pubmed or Jstor or whatever searching for heart disease research without running into a solid fifty years worth of articles that reveal that (gasp) active people (whatever that means in that particular study) have less heart disease of the artery clogging type. It’s...

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