The You&Me Blog

Today we are taking a look back at some of our earliest contributors (2008! We still published on paper!) and wondering what they are doing now. Mary Weeks-Ayala, http://www.youandmemagazine.com/articles/colon-cancer-death-sentence-rev... unfortunately did not live much longer after her article was originally published. She passed away December 22, 2008. http://www.legacy.com/obituaries/dfw/obituary-preview.aspx?pid=121741470 We’ve probably given a shout out to Amanda Rippen (White) http://www.amandarippenwhitephotography.com/ before. But we’ll do it again, because she’s just so talented...
Here at the You&Me America’s Medical Magazine blog we love the history of medicine, and frequently post musings, factoids and other interesting tidbits from the past. But the editorial we is getting quite tired of people retroactively re-diagnosing historical figures. You know, “maybe so and so didn’t have x, they had y!” In baseball the tie goes to the runner, in foil the point goes to the fencer with right of way and in diagnoses, the diagnosis, in the absence of being able to exam the patient and often the lack of any x-rays, vital signs, lab test, MRIs. CTs and so on, has to go to the...
Disease go away. We know that. Sometimes it’s because of heroic efforts to eradicate them. Or perhaps we just create new categories, expectations and descriptions that replace the old entity. And sometimes it’s just what the heck? For example, bladder stones. Two hundred years ago it seemed like everyone in Europe had them, especially the men. In fact, contrary to what you might expect, it was a disease of young men, and in some areas it was so prevalent as to be considered endemic. Nowadays if you google “bladder stone” first up you’ll get a mix of articles on kidney stones in people and...
With the 100th anniversery of the Battle of the Somme coming up recently we were moved to visit the medical care of World War 1. This is King George Hospital, a giant military hospital in Stamford Street, Waterloo, London. If it looks like they're sitting in a warehouse it's because they are. The hospital was created out of a requisitioned, repurposed warehouse, which apparently took some doing, between modifying the original structure and labor problems. The hospital opened at the end of May 1915 and closed June 15, 1919. http://ezitis.myzen.co.uk/kinggeorgestamford.html has a bunch of...
Don’t eat poop …and other lessons from Tudor times. When it comes to death and disease, we’re all magical thinkers. If we just do x, or do it hard enough or often enough, then y (in this case death or diabetes or cancer) won’t come. It’s a useful fantasy in some ways, but in other ways it’s not so helpful. Because when fantasy intersects with public policy, then you have problems. For instance, the other day the National Health Service poohbahs in the UK were having one of their regularly scheduled meetings to declare they were experiencing various crises, and especially they were way over...
Amy Oestreicher, author of "Perchance to Dream" http://www.youandmemagazine.com/articles/perchance-to-dream and Running Away From Depression: My Tale of Surgery and Runner's High" http://www.youandmemagazine.com/articles/running-away-from-depression-my-tale-of-surgery-and-runners-high has a TEDx talk up on Youtube that might be of interest to our readers. She talks about thriving after sexual assault and twenty-seven surgeries. https://youtu.be/0x5KtBAW2EI
Our writers don’t just write essays, they write entire books. Here are links to just a few: Karen Alaniz https://www.amazon.com/Breaking-Code-Daughters-Question-Everything-ebook... David Eyes http://www.amazon.com/David-Eyes/e/B001KIYCU0/ref=sr_tc_2_0?qid=1465846504&sr= 1-2-ent Risa Nye http://www.amazon.com/Risa-Nye/e/B00DF7PU46/ref=dp_byline_cont_pop_book_1 Patricia Cyr https://www.amazon.com/Patients-Perspective-Tips-Doctor-Visits/dp/146364... Stephanie Allen Crist https://www.amazon.com/Discovering-Autism-Neurodiversity-Memoir/dp/15077...
Popular fiction or folkways often gloss over or ignore the diseases of the past and their impact on the people who endured them. Did you see “Master and Commander” or do you enjoy this or the other nautical novels of Patrick O’Brian? Although these are often praised for their authentic detail, they have one glaring admission—scurvy and other diseases would have meant that the crew of the ship in the novel “Master and Commander” would have had to be refreshed about three times during the voyage the book treats with, due to deaths from disease. We guess a movie/book featuring the crew of a ship...
In some ways we wish we could accept all our queries. It doesn’t make us feel good to say no. We have found that it isn’t possible to give each individual feedback on why a query was unsuccessful; some writers don’t want it, some would waste their time on false hopes, trying to “fix” the piece and, although the editorial we has taught creative writing, that’s not the relationship in play here. So we are creating this blog post, as a handy reference to those in search of guidance on how to make a successful query to any magazine, or those wishing to have a list of reasons their query may not...
Dr Smith at the Southern State Hospital for the Insane looks out into the admitting office waiting room on a pleasant Monday morning, May 15, 1916. A quiet day so far, only three patients, two sitting fairly quietly with their groups of attendants, probably family members, and one woman with a man who might be her husband. This one keeps getting up and pacing for a few seconds, then sitting back down. Better get started, Dr. Smith says to himself, there will probably be more, and worse, later today. He calls his first patient, Mrs. McCreedy. She comes into the examining office, accompanied by...

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