The You&Me Blog

Welcome back to “Our Sickest Presidents” Today’s post deals with our second “finalist” Andrew Jackson. Shooting at Andrew Jackson was like swatting at a wasp. You’d better make a killing hit because otherwise you’ve just made him/her angrier. Jackson was amazingly tough, but then he had to be. Most of his life he suffered from morbidity that would have killed or completely incapacitated a normal man. He does appear to have been fairly healthy as a young man, except for a traumatic few weeks in 1781. The Jackson family was active supporters of independence from Britain. Jackson and his brother...
The medical histories of the past fascinate me. By default, they tend to medical histories of the powerful and famous, because that's the information that people care to study and keep. There's something inspirational, though, in seeing that these people also had their share, and sometimes more than their share, of problems, including medical problems. Presidents, they're just like us! In picking our finalists we looked at two factors--severity of illness and impact on the actual presidency. Here is the amazing history of our first finalist, Franklin Delano Roosevelt. Well, of course, the...
You&Me Announces the Our Sickest Presidents Contest Part of our ongoing blog series on maladies of the rich and famous Factual information for this series is from a number of sources, including Wikipedia, the fascinating book The Health of the Presidents by John R. Bumgarner M.D. and the informative website http://www.doctorzebra.com You’d think that to be president of the United States of America takes so much mental and physical effort that only the super-humanly healthy or lucky can do it. But you’d think wrong. US presidents as a group have suffered from whatever ills of the flesh in...
Continuing our theme of idiosyncratic categorization, Karen has been a very popular first name amongst our contributors. It would be nice if our blog posts seemed able to copy hyperlinks, but just put the relevant info in the search window to get to the articles. Karen Strine is the author of Brain Tumor: Too Much Information? Karen Taylor wrote Progressive Supranuclear Palsy: Dealing with Dad Karen L. Alaniz gave us Multiple Sclerosis: New Shoes, one of our first articles. Karen Ott Mayer wrote Hospice: One Death. Karen Mullins Lamb contributed Cancer: The Diagnosis.
When people play actual Lifeboat, if indeed they do, as the only time I actually saw it played was on an inpatient psych unit, but that’s another story, they always want to keep the doctor, or med student or whatever. Really, they should just toss ‘em to the sharks, because without the right technology a world famous doctor, or even a good nurse, can’t do anything more than an intelligent person with a first aid book could. So far we have identified five drugs that can be used in the stranded situation, and I’ll just throw on one more-loperamide. Sure the runs are hilarious, but pooping...
Our contributors are a talented bunch. We’re always amazed at the amount of creative work they’ve created. We’d like to use some blog posts to focus on their “extracurricular” activities in a little more depth. Today’s post is called the Amys because we have been gifted with no less than four contributors named Amy (or Amye, but we’re counting it.) In no particular order: Amy Browne, author of “Bell’s Palsy: No Hope,” “Lawnmower Accident” and “Heart Attack: Never Too Young” is living a quiet life as far as the internet is concerned. Amy Oestreicher, author of “Perchance to Dream” is a...
Medical Lifeboat Part 2 Welcome back to Medical Lifeboat with Doc Contrarian, a drug related version of the cruel party game where you decide what (or who) you really want to keep… Last time we set up some parameters, and nominated a broad spectrum antibiotic and aspirin for our top two medications to be shipwrecked with. What should be our third choice? This one may surprise you, but I’m going to say…Valium. Valium! What do we need mother’s little helper for? So everyone can get high? Well, I agree that insomnia and anxiety are often worried-well, first world complaints or the cause or...
Hi, Doc Contrarian here. Yes, I’m a real MD, but that’s not my real name. I’m not telling you my real name, because that would be telling. Sometimes I like to rile people up with my opinions, or as I like to refer to them, my irrefutable truths. Other times I just like to sit around and think about medicine, because I’m a colossal nerd. All doctors are really, even the surgeons. Especially the surgeons. They’re nerds that will cut you. Ahem. Anyway we’d like to apologize for that last paragraph, which has nothing to do with the theme of this post, which asks the following question: What are...
Andy Warhol famously said “in the future, etc.” but fame today is not some much attenuated in time, but in intensity, Nowadays the world is full of people who are a little bit famous. Not so 80 or 90 years ago. If you could somehow break through the fame barrier you were a lot famous. You fame was lasting and everybody knew who you were; Picasso, Garbo, Hemingway. Ah, Hemingway. Being a famous writer in the first third of the 20th century was a great gig. You were a celebrity, with paparazzi following you around and people asking your opinions on things you knew nothing about, but better than...

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